Communities of Practice – A Framework for Learning and Improvement

February 4, 2011 at 2:19 am 7 comments

One of the sessions at the 2011 annual meeting of Alliance for Continuing Medical Education that I was supposed to participate in was to report on the work of a “Community of Practice”. The session was canceled because an attempt to get a community established failed to materialize. So what are these things called Communities of Practice (COP)? Take a look at the graphic. It provides a good description of a COP.

COP’s are usually comprised of a group of individuals who find they have a common area of interest or a common concern. They build a trusted relationship with each other around the area of common interest and begin to share their unique knowledge and experience related to the issue. By doing so they soon develop a shared understanding and approach to the issue and build a collective knowledge base which informs their practice guiding how they approach the common area of concern. The end result is that the experience of the COP builds in each member a collective knowledge base that, when applied, improves their individual performance and can have a dramatic impact on improving the issue they were drawn together to address.

Think of all of the things happening in CME that might benefit from COP’s forming to explore issues, develop deeper levels of understanding, produce resources for all of us to use. Things like Maintenance of Certification, Maintenance of Licensure, Integrating QI and CME, PI CME, Utilizing Social Media in Healthcare and Physician Learning – and this just scratches the surface of possibilities.

COP’s are engaging, intellectually stimulating, and fun. Find one or start one. You’ll be glad you did.

Integrating Education and Quality Improvement – The New Normal

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Entry filed under: CME, CME Issues, CME People, Improvement, Physician Continuing Education, PI CME. Tags: , , , , , .

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